Oversized load coming through!! Imagine passing by a semi truck on the highway carrying a giant potato weighing 4 TONS. It's not imaginary though, it's a real sight! Ok.. the potato might not actually be real, but The Big Idaho Potato Truck surely is and it's making its 9th cross-country journey.

This tater obviously isn't just any tater. It  would take over 7,000 years to grow and 2 years for it to bake! Weighing in at 4 tons, this equals the weight of 21,562 medium-sized Idaho® potatoes. It's 802 times heavier than the largest potato ever grown (which weighed 11 pounds). It would also make 20,217 servings of mashed potatoes and easily make over 1 million average-sized french fries!

Keep reading to find your next opportunity to see The Big Idaho Potato Truck for yourself!

What began in 2012 as a one-year campaign to celebrate the 75th Anniversary of the Idaho Potato Commission has since turned into an annual tour across the country promoting the certified heart-healthy Idaho Potato. On a bigger scale, The Big Idaho Potato Truck's mission is to help small charities in towns and cities it visits with its A Big Helping program.

The Big Idaho Potato Truck has already passed through Blackfoot, Idaho last month and recently was a part of the Coeur d’Alene Fourth of July Parade over the holiday weekend. According to schedule, The Big Idaho Potato is heading to Oregon next, then California, Nevada and even Texas before ending it's tour back in Idaho at the Braun Brothers Reunion in Challis, ID on August 12th - 14th at 331 Golf Club Lane.

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