I don't know who needs to hear this but obviously someone does: Do not bring a gun, especially a loaded one, through the TSA checkpoint at the Boise Airport.

Transportation Security Administration officers are reminding travelers to check the contents of their luggage after finding a LOADED handgun in a passenger's carry-on bag at the Boise Airport on Tuesday.

During a routine screening the gun was spotted on the X-ray screen and Boise Police were notified right away. The firearm - a 9 mm Sig Sauer P365 semi-automatic pistol - was loaded with 19 rounds of ammunition. This could a result in a hefty fine of up to $10,000 for the passenger. The Ada County prosecutor's office are also looking to the incident.

This is not the first time a firearm has been discovered by TSA at the Boise Airport. In fact, this is the fifth incident just this year! If you must travel with your firearm it must be unloaded, packed in a locked, hard-sided case and inside of checked baggage. You are also required to notify the airline.

“This is another example of a passenger not taking time to check the contents of their carry-on luggage, which resulted in an expensive and inconvenient series of events,” said TSA Federal Security Director for Idaho Andy Coose. “In addition, this passenger’s actions slowed down the security screening process for travelers who were coming through the security checkpoint around the same time. With the number of people departing Boise Airport this summer, please be aware of what you have in your carry-on luggage.”

Incidents like this are exactly what passengers flying out of the Boise Airport DON'T need. According to the TSA, passenger screening volumes at Boise are currently more than 110% of 2019 volumes and are expected to increase throughout the summer months. "It is critical that travelers come prepared for the screening process to ensure the most efficient experience for everyone," says the TSA.

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