Late on Friday afternoon in Washington, special counsel Robert Mueller turned in his long-awaited final report concerning investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by President Trump.

The report, still confidential, was submitted to Attorney General William P. Barr. Barr then quickly notified Congress that it had received Mueller's report but did not comment on it's contents.

"Separately, I intend to consult with the Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law, including the Special Counsel regulation, and the Departments long-standing practices and polices. I remain committed to as much transparency as possible...," Barr said in his letter to Congress.

Although at this point, many of the large-scale questions of the probe remain unanswered, the delivery of the report does mean that the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the Trump campaigns and RUssia, or of obstruction by the president.

Trump has said he wishes the documents to be made public, repeatedly calling it a "witch hunt."

No matter the findings in Mueller’s report, the investigation has already shed light on Russia’s assault on the American political system. Over the 21-month investigation, Mueller has brought charges against 34 people, including six aides and advisers to the president, and three companies.

A White House spokeswoman, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said, “The next steps are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course.” She added that the White House had not seen or been briefed on the report, although officials were notified that Mr. Mueller had delivered it shortly before Congress was notified.

Barr told congressional leaders in a letter late Friday that he may brief them within days on the special counsel’s findings. “I may be in a position to advise you of the special counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend,” he wrote in a letter to the leadership of the House and Senate Judiciary committees.