Skiers have a language all their own, but there are a few words that carry over for non-skiers, like faceplant and dump.  Before you head out to shred the pow pow on the red run and try to avoid the pizza slice, make sure you know the jargon.

Although skiers may be competitive, it seems rare to find one that's stressed out, or that can't find time in their day to have fun with words.

A pizza slice, according to Flexiski.com is officially called a snowplow, and it's "a technique used when first learning to ski where your skis tilt together in the shape of a pizza slice. A way of controlling speed before learning to turn."  The triangle helps put the brakes on.

A "Liftie" is the person who operates a ski lift.  And the "crust" is the top layer of snow that's frozen solid (usually first thing in the morning), and you need to break through that to get to the soft snow underneath.

See how many ski terms you know.

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